Misery Loves Company

When Faustus first asks why Lucifer wants his mortal soul, Mephistophilis responds that Satan’s goal is to enlarge his kingdom. Faustus presses the demon for the truth, and he responds:

Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris.

This roughly translates to the common idiom: “Misery loves company.” This is a phrase frequently heard in modern conversation, and is thus another example of Doctor Faustus’ impact on contemporary culture.

Misery Loves Company

When Faustus first asks why Lucifer wants his mortal soul, Mephistophilis responds that Satan’s goal is to enlarge his kingdom. Faustus presses the demon for the truth, and he responds:

Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris.

This roughly translates to the common idiom: “Misery loves company.” This is a phrase frequently heard in modern conversation, and is thus another example of Doctor Faustus’ impact on contemporary culture.

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Christopher Marlowe's play, Doctor Faustus, is under attack. For three key reasons, this work of literature deserves a place of honor on Mr. Davis AP English syllabus.

1- Doctor Faustus is part of a legacy in Western literature and has been retold in many genres, languages, and centuries.

2- Key themes of Western literature-sin, the fantastic, and knowledge-are explored in the work.

3- Doctor Faustus is a work of literary merit. Firstly, it illuminates the main characters (Faustus and Mephistophilis), both of which recur in literature. Secondly, it utilizes rhetorical and literary devices. And thirdly, it provides a point of comparison against which other examples of the Faust tale can be compared.

On this tumblr, there are a series of posts on a range of topics, from video material of modern adaptations to traditional written dialogues on various aspects of Doctor Faustus. The variety and depth of the information found here is presented to demonstrate the importance of Marlowe's play and its value on Mr. Davis' syllabus.

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